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Forum Post: Trillions for big banks... 1 trillion to Bank Of America alone - this is our monetary policy at work

Posted 2 years ago on June 19, 2012, 3:02 a.m. EST by TrevorMnemonic (5827)
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

Article written by Alan Grayson

This is from the first independent audit of the Federal Reserve in the Fed's 99-year history.

Feel free to take a look at it yourself, it's right here - http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d11696.pdf-

It documents Wall Street bailouts by the Fed that dwarf the $700 billion TARP, and everything else you've heard about.

I wouldn't want anyone to think that I'm dramatizing or amplifying what this GAO report says, so I'm just going to list some of my favorite parts, by page number.

Page 131 - The total lending for the Fed's "broad-based emergency programs" was $16,115,000,000,000. That's right, more than $16 trillion. The four largest recipients, Citigroup, Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch and Bank of America, received more than a trillion dollars each. The 5th largest recipient was Barclays PLC. The 8th was the Royal Bank of Scotland Group, PLC. The 9th was Deutsche Bank AG. The 10th was UBS AG. These four institutions each got between a quarter of a trillion and a trillion dollars. None of them is an American bank.

Pages 133 & 137 - Some of these "broad-based emergency program" loans were long-term, and some were short-term. But the "term-adjusted borrowing" was equivalent to a total of $1,139,000,000,000 more than one year. That's more than $1 trillion out the door. Lending for these programs in fact peaked at more than $1 trillion.

Pages 135 & 196 - Sixty percent of the $738 billion "Commercial Paper Funding Facility" went to the subsidiaries of foreign banks. 36% of the $71 billion Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility also went to subsidiaries of foreign banks.

Page 205 - Separate and apart from these "broad-based emergency program" loans were another $10,057,000,000,000 in "currency swaps." In the "currency swaps," the Fed handed dollars to foreign central banks, no strings attached, to fund bailouts in other countries. The Fed's only "collateral" was a corresponding amount of foreign currency, which never left the Fed's books (even to be deposited to earn interest), plus a promise to repay. But the Fed agreed to give back the foreign currency at the original exchange rate, even if the foreign currency appreciated in value during the period of the swap. These currency swaps and the "broad-based emergency program" loans, together, totaled more than $26 trillion. That's almost $100,000 for every man, woman, and child in America. That's an amount equal to more than seven years of federal spending -- on the military, Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, interest on the debt, and everything else. And around twice American's total GNP.

Page 201 - Here again, these "swaps" were of varying length, but on Dec. 4, 2008, there were $588,000,000,000 outstanding. That's almost $2,000 for every American. All sent to foreign countries. That's more than twenty times as much as our foreign aid budget.

Page 129 - In October 2008, the Fed gave $60,000,000,000 to the Swiss National Bank with the specific understanding that the money would be used to bail out UBS, a Swiss bank. Not an American bank. A Swiss bank.

Pages 3 & 4 - In addition to the "broad-based programs," and in addition to the "currency swaps," there have been hundreds of billions of dollars in Fed loans called "assistance to individual institutions." This has included Bear Stearns, AIG, Citigroup, Bank of America, and "some primary dealers." The Fed decided unilaterally who received this "assistance," and who didn't.

Pages 101 & 173 - You may have heard somewhere that these were riskless transactions, where the Fed always had enough collateral to avoid losses. Not true. The "Maiden Lane I" bailout fund was in the hole for almost two years.

Page 4 - You also may have heard somewhere that all this money was paid back. Not true. The GAO lists five Fed bailout programs that still have amounts outstanding, including $909,000,000,000 (just under a trillion dollars) for the Fed's Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities Purchase Program alone. That's almost $3,000 for every American.

Page 126 - In contemporaneous documents, the Fed apparently did not even take a stab at explaining why it helped some banks (like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley) and not others. After the fact, the Fed referred vaguely to "strains in the financial markets," "transitional credit," and the Fed's all-time favorite rationale for everything it does, "increasing liquidity."

81 different places in the GAO report - The Fed applied nothing even resembling a consistent policy toward valuing the assets that it acquired. Sometimes it asked its counterparty to take a "haircut" (discount), sometimes it didn't. Having read the whole report, I see no rhyme or reason to those decisions, with billions upon billions of dollars at stake.

Page 2 - As massive as these enumerated Fed bailouts were, there were yet more. The GAO did not even endeavor to analyze the Fed's discount window lending, or its single-tranche term repurchase agreements.

Pages 13 & 14 - And the Fed wasn't the only one bailing out Wall Street, of course. On top of what the Fed did, there was the $700,000,000,000 TARP program authorized by Congress (which I voted against). The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) also provided a federal guarantee for $600,000,000,000 in bonds issued by Wall Street.

What a trillion dollars looks like - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNFb6qe7Tmg

7 Comments

7 Comments


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[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 2 years ago

Lucky it's only worthless paper, huh?

[-] 1 points by TrevorMnemonic (5827) 1 year ago

It's definitely worth less over time.

More money printed for the banks and the working man's dollar power decreases.

Inflation is a scam.

[-] 2 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

A fiat economy is a scam.

It's a ponzi scheme that only benefits the wealthy.

Use cash to pay for basics only, and refuse to use credit.

The fact that the nation's debt now outweighs the GDP means that all wage and salary earners are now indebted forever.

Your children are being born into a slave economy.

So much for Land of the Free.

[-] 1 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 1 year ago

I believe the GDP is measure by year

[-] 1 points by Builder (4202) 1 year ago

Yes, it is. So is the debt.

Didn't congress almost dissolve parliament over raising the debt level again?

[-] 1 points by TrevorMnemonic (5827) 1 year ago

I always wondered what would have really happened

[-] 1 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 1 year ago

deficit is measured by year