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Forum Post: Ethical Standard Guaranteed to Fix the Economy

Posted 2 years ago on July 22, 2012, 5:02 p.m. EST by Misaki (893)
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

Two options for job creation:

1) Higher government spending and taxes: http://wh.gov/aJ6T

2) Working less so companies can hire more: http://wh.gov/cVNr

If you do not take a minute to sign either one, or both, of these petitions, you are unethical, immoral, or colloquially, "evil". This is completely legal of course.

Anyone who benefits by association with someone who has not signed either of these petitions is also "evil".

A brief description of how to encourage people to work less for those unfamiliar with the concept:

The first 20 hours are paid at 1.2 times the normal hourly rate for full-time work.

Work beyond 20 hours in a single week is paid at 0.8 times the normal hourly rate.

In the event neither petition receives enough signatures to earn a response, we can conclude that everyone else in the United States is "evil" and people should be made aware of this so the unemployed and poor do not keep hoping for a peaceful resolution to their problems and intelligent people do not feel they need to look for one.

A thank you to Yoko Ono for allowing comments to be published on her site.

12 Comments

12 Comments


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[-] 5 points by geo (2638) from Concord, NC 2 years ago

If you do not take a minute to sign either one, or both, of these petitions, you are unethical, immoral, or colloquially, "evil". This is completely legal of course.

Surely you jest.... Way to be judgmental. On the Federal level increased government spending does not necessarily mean higher taxes... MMT.

There are more than just the two way, black/white, yes/no, digital way of dealing with things.

[-] 1 points by Misaki (893) 1 year ago

http://jobcreationplan.blogspot.com/2012/06/inflation-scam.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/jan/20/morgan-stanley-staff-16bn-profits-triple

The average salary of a worker in the industry in New York jumped to $361,330 in 2010, a 16 percent increase over the average last year, according to the report. That is more than five times the average private sector salary in New York, which stands at $66,120.

Goldman handed its staff a $15.3bn pay and bonus pool – an average of $430,000 per employee...

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/10/11/wall-street-could-face-10000-additional-job-losses/

The average salary of a worker in the industry in New York jumped to $361,330 in 2010, a 16 percent increase over the average last year, according to the report. That is more than five times the average private sector salary in New York, which stands at $66,120.

[-] 2 points by geo (2638) from Concord, NC 1 year ago

You really believe that the janitors, executive assistants, secretaries, IT staff, tellers, accounting clerks, payroll staff, human resources, etc, the vast majority of the employees who make up these firms are making between $361,000 and $430,000 per year as you allege? The average salary of a worker in the industry

Get real and stop the propaganda. Outside of upper management and some top brokers and traders, the salaries in the industry are in line with others in the private sector of equivalent work type...... a very small minority are making outrageous sums of money. In typical supply side economics fashion, it does not filter down to the support staff, which make up most of the employees in these companies.

[Removed]

[-] -2 points by Porkie (-255) 2 years ago

Evil is not a colloquialism; death is the ultimate evil that continues to haunt us; all that is "good" is of our desire to deny it.

[-] 1 points by 1sealyon (434) 1 year ago

So now if you work hard and put in a lot of extra hours (maybe work two or three jobs) to put food on the table for your family, shoes on your children's feet, and buy fuel to keep them warm you are evil?

[-] 1 points by Misaki (893) 1 year ago

Well, almost no one signed it. (It's expired by now) So presumably either people are fine with that label, or they don't agree with this ethical standard.

Though I don't actually see how you draw a connection between working hard "to put food on the table" and this ethical standard... this is just about signing petitions, for the amount of time worked you might want to see http://jobcreationplan.blogspot.com/2012/07/psychology-of-rich.html (which links to "The accelerated work week as moral imperative").

[-] 1 points by freewriterguy (882) 2 years ago

add to that, anyone who works over 40 hours, should be able to keep every dime they made, in exchange for being away from their family. The government, the false entity that mechanically enslaves us doesnt deserve any more of our money.

[-] 1 points by Misaki (893) 1 year ago

Such as this guy? http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/pa_police_ot_sarge_livin_large_RjaEvsSKBB7VhOrlH0E8dI

Rivera — a 16-year veteran who’s consistently among the PA’s top OT earners — last year raked in a total of $273,946 thanks to $166,035 in overtime on top of his base pay of $107,911.

The Staten Island resident gets paid about $51.88 an hour typically to supervise cops who patrol the PATH line. But that rate jumps to $77.82 for time-and-a-half overtime — and insiders predict that at the rate he’s going, he’ll likely eclipse his 2011 earnings and pull in more than of the agency’s other 7,300 full-time workers.

[-] 1 points by geo (2638) from Concord, NC 1 year ago

$100,000 salary in New York City barely makes you middle class. $100,000 salary in Detroit makes you incredibly wealthy.

I don't begrudge the police their money in NYC. You can thank the police unions. A starting fireman in NYC qualifies for food stamps.

[-] -1 points by Misaki (893) 1 year ago

And is $273k still "barely middle class"? Considering that, as mentioned in a comment above, the average salary of a private sector worker in New York City (where "average" includes the financial sector with its own average of $361k) is $66k.

If you think the government should let government employees make $273k after overtime, but it shouldn't tax those people (since they're working overtime) or anyone else who makes that much from overtime, then either you must support inflation (which helps Wall Street, as mentioned in an above comment) or you don't understand math.

[-] 1 points by geo (2638) from Concord, NC 1 year ago

Once again your studies are false:

"Wall Street firms typically reserve a portion of revenue throughout the year for employees, awarding much of the money as year-end bonuses. Average pay per worker doesn’t reflect the amount of money employees actually receive. Top executives and revenue producers sometimes receive multimillion-dollar awards, while clerical workers get smaller salaries."

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-07-19/morgan-stanley-cuts-pay-pool-for-investment-bank-by-15-percent

$273K is solid Middle Class in NYC. I don't begrudge someone working overtime to make this money if they can. They are often working shifts that no one else wants to work, like holidays and odd hours to do so....they are also the exception not the rule. Most cops who work OT do not make $200K a year.

Decent wages do not support inflation. Decent wages are necessary for a good economy. You can't have a strong domestic market without consumers who make a good living. That is the basis of economics.

Being in support of wage suppression supports the 1%

[-] 1 points by Misaki (893) 1 year ago

They might not get it immediately, but they do get the money. From an article last year:

It has already tried to demonstrate a willingness to change with a provision that bonuses can be clawed back should performance turn sour. This is an attempt to counter criticism that before the banking crisis bonuses were paid in cash leaving firms with no means of redress when losses occurred later.

Another article talks about the pay of an entry-level employee...

"25 years old, and in my first year I made £45k plus a 70% bonus. So over 75k, one year out of university. That is quite something, let me tell you. But within six months you get used to it. I would spend £250 on a night out, and think nothing of it, spend £100 on dinner and genuinely think to myself: well, that was not too expensive.

"This was a lesson: it doesn't really matter how much you make, because your lifestyle and expectations move up with your income."

Where £75k= $115k. Not bad for just out of university.

They are often working shifts that no one else wants to work, like holidays and odd hours to do so....they are also the exception not the rule. Most cops who work OT do not make $200K a year.

So because they are an exception, you think this means they shouldn't have to pay taxes on that income?

Being in support of wage suppression supports the 1%

Being in support of unemployment supports the 1%. People working overtime at high pay rates lead to fewer jobs available for other workers, especially when taxpayers are footing the bill for those extremely high wages (instead of a corporation with billions in extra cash).