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Forum Post: Chris Hedges: Stand Still for the Apocalypse

Posted 1 year ago on Nov. 26, 2012, 3:45 p.m. EST by LeoYo (5909)
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Chris Hedges: Stand Still for the Apocalypse

Monday, 26 November 2012 09:15 By Chris Hedges, Truthdig | News Analysis

http://truth-out.org/news/item/12949-chris-hedges-stand-still-for-the-apocalypse

Humans must immediately implement a series of radical measures to halt carbon emissions or prepare for the collapse of entire ecosystems and the displacement, suffering and death of hundreds of millions of the globe’s inhabitants, according to a report commissioned by the World Bank. The continued failure to respond aggressively to climate change, the report warns, will mean that the planet will inevitably warm by at least 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century, ushering in an apocalypse.

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Gaza’s Other War

Monday, 26 November 2012 11:09 By Marc Herman, Pacific Standard | News Analysis

http://truth-out.org/news/item/12962-gazas-other-war

Of all the things the governments of Israel and Gaza have against each other, the fate of a water treatment plant would seem like the least of the problem. A little-noted UN report released in August argued the opposite: that the rockets flying between the two sides may be less destructive than long-standing wrangles over water. Gaza in 2020 is sober reading even as government resource reports go. Being a desert, sources of water are few, straining an aquifer that feeds the tiny strip as well as parts of Israel and Egypt. According to the U.N. Environment Program, only ten percent of the aquifer’s water remains potable, and it will become entirely useless in as little as three years, beyond which point it will take centuries to replenish itself. From the UN study:

With no perennial streams and low rainfall, Gaza relies almost completely on the underlying coastal aquifer, which is partly replenished by rainfall and runoff from the Hebron hills to the east, with the recharge estimated at 50 to 60 million cubic metres (MCM) annually.

Current abstraction of water from the aquifer, at an estimated 160 MCM per year to meet current overall demand, is well beyond that. As groundwater levels subsequently decline, sea water infiltrates from the nearby Mediterranean Sea. Salinity levels have thus risen well beyond guidelines by the World Health Organization (WHO) for safe drinking water. This pollution is compounded by contamination of the aquifer by nitrates from uncontrolled sewage, and fertilizers from irrigation of farmlands.

Today 90% of water from the aquifer is not safe for drinking without treatment. Availability of clean water is thus limited for most Gazans with average consumption of 70 to 90 litres per person per day (depending on the season), below the global WHO standard of 100 litres per person per day. The aquifer could become unusable as early as 2016, with the damage irreversible by 2020.

Various attempts to solve the problem have met with middling results. A passel of NGO and UN-led initiatives have sought to develop desalinization capacity and water treatment plants. Typically, the projects have run into import issues—parts for water treatment facilities are hard to get into Gaza without running afoul of security rules that ban import of many industrial materials.

If the U.N. estimate is accurate, that gives leaders in Gaza and Israel three years to hammer out the details of their coexistence before it becomes impossible for the strip, which is smaller than Los Angeles, to provide potable water to its 1.6 million people. Last summer, the British charity Oxfam claimed that Gaza residents were spending as much as a third of their monthly family income buying water on a fierce private market, and reports including this useful one from the Jerusalem Post noted that Gaza’s water authority had faced price increases from the territory’s chief provider of clean water—Israel.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license.

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[-] 3 points by beautifulworld (22226) 1 year ago

First gas tanker crosses the Arctic. Note: Not a good thing. Here is an article about it:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20454757

Also, there are 44 million fewer birds in the UK since 1966. Also, not a good thing.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/nov/19/uk-breeding-bird-population-decline

[-] 2 points by hchc (3297) from Tampa, FL 1 year ago

At 118 million households in the US, and the cost of putting solar on one home around 30k, the cost to do this to the entire nation would be a little more than 3Trillion.

Which happens to be the same amount of money we gave to the wealthy with the bailouts.

What a freakin scam.