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Forum Post: Another Authoritarian RepubliCon Abusing Power? FLAB-SCAM!

Posted 8 months ago on Jan. 9, 2014, 11:36 p.m. EST by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

A GOP Governor Criminally Abusing Power making MSM Front Page News. Now that's News!

Which 1% scumbag did Christie piss off?

Stories Add Up as Bully Image Trails Christie

Richard Perry/The New York Times/ December 24, 2013

Gov. Chris Christie in October. Officials in both parties say he exacts revenge for even mild criticism, an assertion Christie mocks.

In 2010, John F. McKeon, a New Jersey assemblyman, made what he thought was a mild comment on a radio program: Some of the public employees that Gov. Chris Christie was then vilifying had been some of the governor’s biggest supporters.

He was surprised to receive a handwritten note from Mr. Christie, telling him that he had heard the comments, and that he didn’t like them.

“I thought it was a joke,” Mr. McKeon recalled. “What governor would take the time to write a personal note over a relatively innocuous comment?”

But the gesture would come to seem genteel compared with the fate suffered by others in disagreements with Mr. Christie: a former governor who was stripped of police security at public events; a Rutgers professor who lost state financing for cherished programs; a state senator whose candidate for a judgeship suddenly stalled; another senator who was disinvited from an event with the governor in his own district.

In almost every case, Mr. Christie waved off any suggestion that he had meted out retribution. But to many, the incidents have left that impression, and it has been just as powerful in scaring off others who might dare to cross him.

Now, the governor is dogged by another accusation of petty political revenge. Two close political allies ordered the abrupt shutdown of two local access lanes on the George Washington Bridge in September, gridlocking Fort Lee, N.J., for four days. The borough’s mayor said it was punitive because he had declined to endorse the governor’s re-election.

The governor mocked the suggestion as preposterous. But Democrats in New Jersey — and privately, some Republicans too — say it would hardly be out of character for Mr. Christie. As the governor prepares to run for president, the accusation has reinforced his reputation as a bully.

“Every organization takes its cues from the leadership as to what’s acceptable and what’s not, and this governor, in his public appearances, has made thuggery acceptable,” said Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski, the Democrat leading the hearings that have exposed the role of the governor’s aides in the lane closings. “For the governor to say, ‘I knew nothing about this’? He created the atmosphere in which this is acceptable.”

It was the governor’s penchant for confrontation that first propelled him onto the national stage in 2010. As he pushed to cut public employee benefits, his staff celebrated video clips of him dressing down teachers at town hall-style meetings by posting them on YouTube. (“You want to come up here? Come up here,” the governor said to one teacher, a fellow Republican, who hesitated until the governor’s security state troopers gave him no choice. Wagging a finger, Mr. Christie lectured the man, then dismissed him from the hall.)

But his confrontations are not always that public.

In 2011, Mr. Christie held a news conference where he accused State Senator Richard J. Codey of being “combative and difficult” in blocking two nominees. Mr. Codey, a Democrat who had served as governor following the resignation of James E. McGreevey, responded that he had not only signed off on the nominations, but had held a meeting to try to hurry them along.

Three days later, Mr. Codey was walking out of an event in Newark when he got a call from the state police superintendent informing him that he would no longer be afforded the trooper who accompanied him to occasional public events — a courtesy granted all former governors. That same day, his cousin, who had been appointed by Mr. McGreevey to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, was fired, as was a close friend and former deputy chief of staff who was then working in the state Office of Consumer Affairs.

“I understand politics, that a new administration comes in,” Mr. Codey said, but he believed this was not about Mr. Christie bringing in his own people. “This was all about sending a message.”

The governor laughed at the allegation of retribution, and his spokesman belittled the Democratic Party chairman who complained about it.

Later that year, the governor was pressing hard on Alan Rosenthal, the Rutgers political scientist whom Republicans and Democrats had chosen as the tiebreaking member of the commission that was redistricting the state’s legislative districts. Mr. Christie wanted Mr. Rosenthal to vote for the map put forward by the Republicans on the commission, but instead he chose the Democrats’ plan, saying it offered more stability.

Soon after, Mr. Christie used his line-item veto to cut $169,000 for two programs at Mr. Rosenthal’s institute at Rutgers.

The apparent payback is not always directed at Democrats — Mr. Christie can be just as hard on Republicans in an attempt to enforce party discipline.

In 2010, when a blizzard paralyzed the state, State Senator Sean T. Kean, a Republican, told a reporter that the “one mistake” the Senate president and governor had made was not calling earlier for a state of emergency, which might have kept more cars off the roads.

Mr. Christie was smarting from criticism that he had remained at Disney World during the storm. When he returned, he held his first news conference in Mr. Kean’s home district. Shortly before, a member of the governor’s staff called Mr. Kean and warned him not to show up. His seat was eliminated in redistricting the following year.

Mr. Kean, now in the Assembly, declined to comment. At the time, an anonymous administration official told The Star-Ledger that Mr. Kean got what he deserved.

Last year, another Republican, State Senator Christopher Bateman, voted against the governor’s plan to reorganize the state’s public medical education system. Mr. Bateman had been working with the governor to get a judge appointed in his home county. Suddenly, after months when it looked as if it would happen, the nomination stalled.

Mr. Bateman, too, declined to comment. But last month, when it came time for Republicans to elect a new leader in the State Senate, he first expressed support for the current leader; then, when Mr. Christie supported someone else, he voted for the governor’s candidate.

(Indicating the governor’s ability to use favor as well as fear, all the Republicans who voted for his preferred candidate, who lost, were rewarded with tickets to the governor’s box at a recent New York Giants game. “I felt kind of cheap,” one said, but added, “to say no is an insult.”)

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/25/nyregion/accounts-of-petty-retribution-reinforce-christies-bullying-image.html?ref=politics&pagewanted=all&_r=2&

6 Comments

6 Comments


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[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 8 months ago

This isn't "bridge-gate," all Christie things considered, this is (c) Flab-Scam!

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 8 months ago

Rachel Maddow Presents New Chris Christie Bridge Scandal Theory

The Huffington Post | By Ashley Alman Posted: 01/09/2014 11:46 pm EST | Updated: 01/10/2014 1:52 pm EST

MSNBC's Rachel Maddow on Thursday presented a new theory why New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) may have wanted to close George Washington Bridge lanes -- a festering feud between the governor and Democrats over state Supreme Court nominees.

As the story stands, Christie's deputy chief of staff called for George Washington Bridge access lane closures that created a massive traffic jam in Fort Lee for four days in September -- a move that many have written off as political retribution for Democratic Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich's refusal to endorse the Republican governor's reelection.

Maddow on Thursday presented an alternate theory, saying Sokolich's endorsement "wasn't that important." Instead, she suggested the political payback was motivated by a tiff between New Jersey state Senate Democrats and the governor.

Maddow took viewers back to 2010, when Christie declined to reappoint a New Jersey Supreme Court justice, John E. Wallace Jr., for another term. The move left state Senate Democrats "absolutely outraged," Maddow explained, and they refused to confirm any Christie's nominees for Wallace's seat.

"It's been a big political crisis in New Jersey," Maddow said.

By last August, Supreme Court Justice Helen Hoens, a Republican, was up for renomination. When state Senate Democrats signaled they would challenge Christie's nomination, the governor said he wouldn't renominate Hoens.

"I simply could not be party to the destruction of Helen Hoens’s professional reputation," Christie said during an August press conference. "I was not going to let her loose to the animals."

"That was an angry Chris Christie," Maddow said. "So angry that he was doing something almost unprecedented in New Jersey: Yanking the tenure of a state Supreme Court justice, who he liked! That was an angry Chris Christie, furious with Senate Dems at a hastily called press conference that took place late in the day on Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2013."

As Maddow pointed out, the press conference was the evening before Christie's deputy chief of staff, Bridget Anne Kelly, sent an email requesting "traffic problems in Fort Lee" to David Wildstein, one of Christie's top aides at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the bridge.

What's more, Fort Lee is represented by Sen. Loretta Weinberg, the state Senate Democratic leader.

"Roughly 12 hours after Gov. Christie blows up at the Senate Democrats and torpedoes the career of a Supreme Court justice who he likes ... the leader of those 'animals' in the Senate sees her district get the order of destruction from Gov. Christie's deputy chief of staff," Maddow concluded.

"Or maybe it was about that endorsement. Until someone who knows the actual truth about this speaks, it remains a wide-open question.”

Christie on Thursday denied any involvement in the bridge closing, blaming his staff. [How RepubliCon of him.]

Watch the full segment here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/09/rachel-maddow-chris-christie_n_4572367.html

[-] 2 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 8 months ago

Try to understand, when they show us over and over and over and over again, RepubliCons ARE NOT fit to hold public office! They can't decipher or discern Democratic Government from Kingdom or Dictatorship. They just can't!

[-] 1 points by WSmith (2091) from Cornelius, OR 8 months ago

Jon Stewart Takes on Christie Presser: Tone He’s Set Is Apparently in ‘F-U Sharp’

http://www.mediaite.com/tv/jon-stewart-takes-on-christie-presser-tone-hes-set-is-apparently-in-f-u-sharp/

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