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Forum Post: 10 Disgusting Examples of Very Young School Children Being Arrested, Handcuffed and Brutalized By Police

Posted 2 years ago on April 21, 2012, 3:10 p.m. EST by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY
This content is user submitted and not an official statement

http://lewrockwell.com/rep3/young-children-brutalized-by-police.html

When did we decide that it was okay to treat very young school children as if they were terror suspects? When I was growing up, I don't remember a single time that the police ever came to my school and arrested anyone. But now police are being called out to public schools at the drop of a hat. All over America, very young school children are being arrested and marched out of their schools in handcuffs in front of all their friends. For example, down in Georgia the other day police were called out because a 6-year-old girl was throwing a tantrum. The police subdued her, slapped handcuffs on her and hauled her off to the police station. Instead of apologizing for this outrageous incident, the police are defending the actions of the officer involved. But this is not an isolated incident. All over the country young kids are being handcuffed and mistreated by police.

The following are 10 more disgusting examples of very young school children being arrested, handcuffed and brutalized by police all over America....

83 Comments

83 Comments


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[-] 3 points by TheEvilFuckaire (208) 2 years ago

The kids should learn at a young age not to move against the state, all must submit their mind to the church, their body to property, and their actions to the state. Otherwise we cannot maintain a free society. How can we maintain a free country, if people are allowed to do what they want? Everyone has to be obedient or we cannot be free. That is what they want us to think anyway.

[-] 3 points by jimmycrackerson (940) from Blackfoot, ID 2 years ago

That's right. Mindless obedience of authority is imperative for freedom to exist. Most adults have these practices fundamentally ingrained. Children are not born with this sense of servility and therefore are the greatest threat to our rights and liberties. I say lock them up--in schools for twelve or thirteen years. If they don't get the point by after that--shit...lock em up for another four or eight years and tack on hundreds-of-thousands of dollars in fees. Then make them work for the rest of their lives.

[-] 2 points by TheEvilFuckaire (208) 2 years ago

What better means of obedience training than a school? Sit down! Shut Up! Don't Talk to each other! Stay in Line! If you don't agree with what this book says then you are stupid! For 12 years we put our kids through this.

[-] -1 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

Just pay your bills and if your borrow money, pay it back. See, now is that hard? Just be a grown up and take a little responsibility for yourself. You're a big boy now.

[-] 1 points by TheEvilFuckaire (208) 2 years ago

Okay, you talk about bills as though letting a few people own everything, and the rest of us are debt slaves for life because we were not born into a family that owns everything is just the way it is supposed to be. Who owns the sky? who owns the coal? the answer is the same no one or every one. But we pay for electricity made from a natural product that rightfully belongs to us all. GET HIERARCHY OUT OF YOUR HEAD! No one owns you and no one has more or less right to the land and what comes from it than you. No one should charge you for anything created by nature.

[-] 1 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 2 years ago

(-) the cost to extract anything created by nature.

[-] 1 points by TheEvilFuckaire (208) 2 years ago

I agree there are costs of human time and energy in extraction. The question is why do you have more, or less, right to do the extracting than me? Since you do not, why does one of us get to extract without paying the other for the material that was taken?

[-] 1 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 2 years ago

they shouldn't

[+] -5 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

You are a lost soul. Sure, it's supposed to be free. You're right, no one owns us. But as true is that no one OWES us.

[-] 2 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

"But as true is that no one OWES us." That's where you're wrong. Grand theft demands restitution. That's the situation.

[-] -3 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

Sure, I know you'll come up with a rationalization that suits you, but your sense of entitlement is showing... again. No one owes you anything.

[-] 2 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

I do feel "entitled" to the rights enumerated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights because I have the correct number of chromosomes. That's right.

http://propertyistheft.wordpress.com/what-i-believe-in/property-is-theft/

In 1840, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon wrote What is Property? Or, an Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of Government. This is considered one of the most influential works of anarchist philosophy and is the origin of the rallying cry “property is theft!” In it, Proudhon poses this question; If I were asked to answer the following question: What is slavery? and I should answer in one word, It is murder, my meaning would be understood at once. No extended argument would be required to show that the power to take from a man his thought, his will, his personality, is a power of life and death; and that to enslave a man is to kill him. Why, then, to this other question: What is property! may I not likewise answer, It is robbery, without the certainty of being misunderstood; the second proposition being no other than a transformation of the first?

[-] -3 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

Great, but I feel entitled to keep my property because I've earned it.

I dunno, maybe you should call the U.N.

[-] 2 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

No, maybe I should help out with #Occupy.

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[-] 2 points by GypsyKing (9780) 2 years ago

This is really incredible. It's like it used to be in East Germany. WTF has happened to this country?

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

The right wing zero tolerance shit took over.

It's been going on for over 20 years now.

[-] 2 points by GypsyKing (9780) 2 years ago

Un f--king believable!

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

It is real bad. Once upon a time if someone bullied you then after school you could face off one on one or if someone was pushing you around and you fought back in school then it could be taken to the principles office and worked out there. Not anymore. Both kids are arrested and sent to jail.

There is a great study that was done a few years ago called the School to Prison Pipeline. It is worth checking out.

[-] 4 points by GypsyKing (9780) 2 years ago

And a "prison industry." Freeking unreal.

[-] 2 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

Part of the reason that doesn't work any more is that kids are more violent these days. We used to be able to work things out with a few punches and get on about your day. Too many stories of kids going back later and shooting up houses lately.

When I grew up (jeez, I sound like grandpa), adults would discipline other people's children. Yell out them, shoo them away - sometimes even physically grab them. These days, people would freak. Today, people take great offense at anyone else disciplining their children. This includes school administrators. So the administrators remove themselves from the mix by using the police. It is unfortunate, but I don't put the blame entirely on the schools. We have allowed this to happen...and I know I'm going to catch some flack for this... but I think it is a more liberal mindset that has created this monster (just my opinion).

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

They are no more violent than they have ever been before. There has been an increase in availability of guns. There is also a problem with inclusion. I don't know how old you are but, many of these kids would have not attended school. We have highly qualified teachers that are trained to deal with these kids but the schools don't want to hire them. Instead they would rather get a couple of aids and mainstream the kids.

Resource officers are now in the schools. In many areas they just follow policy and the ability for principals to step in has been taken away.One of the most astounding things that I have discovered is that in some areas it is policy that the police can come to the school to investigate and the school acts as guardian. This means that they will allow the police to talk to a kid without a parent.

I never lived in an area where other adults were allowed to discipline someone else's children. Ever.

[-] 1 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

Maybe discipline isn't the right word, and it wasn't a matter of it being "allowed" as much as it was accepted. For example, if there were kids at a playground and they were doing something they shouldn't be doing - people were more likely to correct the child, and tell them to stop it, even in some cases grab the child to get them to stop. Now people just look around and wonder where the kids parents are. I think kids were more well behaved because there was always an adult around that would hold them accountable - but not they only have to worry about their parents...and even then the supervision is often lacking.

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

No. Not really.You usually have to either see something dangerous or know the parents before you step in. These boundaries are not new.

[-] 1 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

I'm curious - how old are you? ballpark - 20s? 30s? 40s? Things have changed greatly over the years, and people's willingness to challenge other people's children on bad behavior has changed.

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/30313559/ns/today-parenting_and_family/t/oh-behave-disciplining-other-peoples-kids/#.T5l4vdlUHTo

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

I'm 41.

I recently attended a conference where this subject was brought up. The presenters were white middle class. A few of us were like.......I don't know where the hell you grew up...but you are relying on nostalgia. The key words were "in a simpler time". Yeah, ok.

[-] 2 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

At least the concept isn't foreign for you. From your response I thought maybe you were unfamiliar with what I was explaining. I thought the article did a pretty giving some more contemporary applications of this concept.

Was it a more simple time? Am I being nostalgic? Yes to both - but the growing sensitivity of parents is one of the factors that has led to school administrators removing themselves from the discipline process and including law enforcement.... In my opinion.

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

I am actually familiar with it. That said, I think it is very unwise to rely on one's nostalgia to repair or fix problems because that nostalgia is different regarding culture, location, class, often gender and ethnicity. There is a very real danger of a one size fits all solution or minimizing other issues.

[-] 1 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

Actually, you started with the "once upon a time" nostalgia in your original response.

[-] 2 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

Because they didn't have cops in schools. It is very true. There was a time before Zero Tolerance polices. That is fact.

[-] 1 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

Sometimes I get to the end of with a discussion on this forum, and I wonder if the other person read anything that I wrote.

[-] 1 points by MattLHolck (16833) from San Diego, CA 2 years ago

if the kid rides a bike with out a helmet, they get stopped here

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

That's silly.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

Interesting that this is being "exposed" by a right wing website. i think in some matters the terms "right" and "left" confuse things.

[-] 3 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

We have been dealing with Zero Tolerance for well over 20 years. I can bring up a lot of websites.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

No argument here.

[-] -2 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

The leftwing suspension of judgment, standards, and shame took over as we pronounced, "Who's to say what's right and wrong?". It's been going on since the 60's.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

Hot load of douchebaggery you got going on there. I expect as much from you.

[-] -1 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

But then again, who's to say what's right and wrong? Your judgments hurt my feelings. LOL

In a system where values have been gradually torn down by the left, where right and wrong and shame no longer exist, what did you expect to happen?

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

What system has been torn down? Why the hell are you blaming it on the left? There is a right and wrong and shame does exist. So, where is it that you seem to think it doesn't?

[-] 0 points by Grownup2 (-31) 2 years ago

Well, if they do still exist, that only means your work remains incomplete.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

That is more your department.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

I doubt stuff like this happened in East Germany.

[-] 1 points by TheMisfit (48) 2 years ago

We have been telling parents (and each other) to be nicer and nicer. Parents are scolded (sometimes arrested) for disciplining their children. teachers cannot paddle a disruptive child and Mommy and Daddy are too busy to be active in their kids lives. This has led to what we have today. As American society gets weaker and weaker, we can expect to see more of this. The kids don't know what PC is and certainly do not fear being accused of going against it like adults do, so they have no inhibitions and no fear of punishment, so they act out in a manner that today's adults are not equipped to handle. These ill prepared adults have no choice but to call the police rather than do what they used to do a couple of decades ago. The US has gotten too soft and weak in the name of PC and we pay the price for it through the degradation of our society, a bit more each and every day.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

School staff also report "Wise ass" parents, or parents who might slap a kid who is misbehaving to "Child protective services" which opens the gate to potential incalculable trauma for the child and the parent, up to and including midnight kidnap with arrest of parent in front of the "rescued" kid.

[-] 1 points by TheMisfit (48) 2 years ago

Just another symptom of our weakening. My state has had to go back and look at how they handle reported child abuse cases after a murder-suicide by a father who had his kids taken away. He was cleared of all wrong after he killed his wife and himself. They lost everything over baseless accusations and now those kids have no parents thanks to some "do gooder" who didn't have any facts.

[-] 2 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

CPS is a major face of tyranny over mainly poor people. The left ignores this perhaps because it is aligned with unions who represent the perpetrators. I'm pro union all the way except when it comes to baby snatchers, cops and prison hacks.

[-] 1 points by beautifulworld (20478) 2 years ago

It's a downhill slide.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

I think school is a good and necessary thing, but they are becoming police precincts and lockups.

[-] 2 points by beautifulworld (20478) 2 years ago

I agree. Schools are run in a very military, brutal way. You have to wonder how much better kids would learn in a loving, nurturing environment rather than the authoritarian environment that exists in most schools.

I was outraged when I heard that if a kid falls asleep in my school district the administration immediately takes the kid out and calls the parents to "ask" permission drug test the kid. And, oftentimes, the lemming parents are afraid to say no. This is standard procedure.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

beautifulworld More reason why a revolution is necessary.

[-] 2 points by beautifulworld (20478) 2 years ago

Yep. We need massive social change.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

This is why people need to pay attention to their local school boards that determine policy. this is actually something that can be changed.

And get rid of that stupid mandatory school uniform shit; the only people that don't know what is going on is the adults.

[-] 0 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

Maybe in some small town the people might actually have a voice in school matters (I kind of doubt it). Certainly in Bloombergtown that is not on the menu. It never was.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

Not unless you bombard them at the meetings. Even then, you are only allotted something like 15 minutes at the end. But, what I am saying is that this is not an area that we can ........allow these people to be elected no questions asked.

Many decisions are local. So, when you start looking at something like Zero Tolerance or even allowing the school to operate as legal guardian while the police question a child can and needs to be addressed.

[-] 0 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

Generally decisions are made outside and prior to public hearings. The hearings usually well rehearsed are relics of what perhaps was a time of real public participation in decision making.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

it takes work to change it. You have a greater chance of impacting local issues then you do at an international or national level unless you do nothing but scream about zero tolerance all over the 'net.

Two, people need to be on their toes in questioning those running for local school board elections.

[-] 0 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

My favorite example is the issue of decent nutritious school lunches. Parents have been complaining, going to meetings and hearings for seventy years about that. One day it might change.

[-] 1 points by GirlFriday (17435) 2 years ago

Farm Bill.

[-] 0 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

GirlFriday "Farm Bill." Farm Jane? Farm Joe? Farm Pat? Wah?

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

The day they start serving attractive and nutritious school lunches in the NYC public schools it most likely won't be noted in the MSM. I saw "Together, we represent millions of Americans supporting policy solutions that restore the right of all children to access good food in school; " My question is when was that right ever acknowledged?

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

I wish good luck to all who struggle within the parameters of the system to get decent food into the NYC public schools. I'd hate to think we need a revolution even to get such a simple and obvious thing done.

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[-] 0 points by Spring12 (25) 2 years ago

Some of these things are ridiculous. First off though I do not at all believe that they would pepper spray a special needs kid, I do not believe that at all. I it is the police policy. The one for the kid attacking the police offer was justified. Now it sounds silly I know but the kid did still break the law regardless of his age. I doesn't matter how old he is, he still knew it was wrong. Now he shouldn't be arrested or anything. Also the whole perfume one is probably not true or a huge exageration. The whole butter knife one was definatly not true. They would not charge a felony for a butter knife.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

Spring12 The article links to respectable mainstream sources.

[-] 0 points by toonces (-117) 2 years ago

Boy, you lived in a sheltered school. I went to school in the '70's and there were frequent visits to take students who had contraband (pot). There was a lot of that in the school...

[-] 0 points by factsrfun (6828) from Phoenix, AZ 2 years ago

We need to take a hard look at what is really happening in this country. The vast majority think that it is “the people” verses “the government” and those who would be king, want the people to think that way. Have you noticed that certain people, we will call them Republicans, are always in favor of putting people in jail for shop lifting and drugs, but any attempt to contain the actions of employers and that’s interfering with freedom, the same people who are more than willing to allow the landlord or employer dictate what healthcare you can have who you can love, or what kind of medicine you can use are the same ones that say it’s an infringement on freedom to restrict the wealthy in any way.

This is not a case of big = bad, small = good, it’s what is the government doing, who is it working for? There are clear sides here, one side wants a government whose propose is to make sure you do as your bosses want, the other, well at least their confused, we can work with that.

[-] 0 points by AntiOWSer (18) 2 years ago

The 6 year old in GA was throwing more than a tantrum. She was throwing things off the wall, ended up injuring the Principal. Yelling, screaming, and breaking stuff. She likely could have hurt herself in the process. What would you rather happen? Unfortunately today, we live in a society where teachers can't lay a finger on a kid, lest they themselves get injured, sued, or both.

They (not sure if it was the school or the cops first) tried to contact her parents, and got no response.

If she was out of control, and parents were unreachable, then what would you have done? Kept allowing her to trash the Principal's office, and interrupt the school from getting work done?

You would think that the mere presence of the police officer would have had her calm down, but it didn't. The police man was already called for, and came down. What would you have suggested the officer have done?

I see nothing wrong with what the police officer had done, and don't blame the Principal for taking the steps (s)he took. I think the spotlight should be placed on the parents for their daughters upbringing, her not respecting property that doesn't belong to her, and for her injuring the Principal.

[-] 2 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

You know for one thing it is reported that the cuffs were very tight, to cause pain to this troubled six year old. Occupiers who've been arrested will be familiar with this type of cop sadism. Also I find the filing of criminal charges to be over the top. Not to mention the possibility that the cops and school staff embellished the narrative in order to justify their actions. It's been known to happen.

[-] -1 points by AntiOWSer (18) 2 years ago

Who reported that they were tight to "cause pain to [a] troubled six year old?"

Because if it didn't originate from the police officer, how do you know the officer's intentions? The girl could be being over dramatic about the pain, or trauma, or influenced by her family about how much it hurt, since the family is calling for everyone involved to be fired.

...As for the pain, it could just be a result of using handcuffs made for adult wrists onto the small wrists of a 6 year old (without having her be able to slip out of them). Nothing intentional I'm sure. If he wanted to intentionally inflict pain, I can think of a couple other options at the officer's disposal.

As far as the charges, it could've been for shock value. After all, the charges were dropped when her family arrived to pick her up.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

"if it didn't originate from the police officer, how do you know the officer's intentions?" EXTRAPOLATING FROM HIS CHARGING THE BABY GIRL WITH ASSAULT...

"...As for the pain, it could just be a result of using handcuffs made for adult wrists onto the small wrists of a 6 year old (without having her be able to slip out of them)."

You should post more often. People in other countries need to be reminded of US cultural values.

[-] -1 points by AntiOWSer (18) 2 years ago

So throwing office furniture around, and injuring the principal isn't assault? And do I need to reiterate again, that the charges were dropped when the kid's family finally arrived to pick up their miscreant child?

[-] 0 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

"...As for the pain, it could just be a result of using handcuffs made for adult wrists onto the small wrists of a 6 year old (without having her be able to slip out of them)." You should post more often. People in other countries need to be reminded of US cultural values.

[-] 1 points by AntiOWSer (18) 2 years ago

What's the point of replying with the same comment from 3 days ago?

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

To remind people who might be passing through here that to some Americans it's acceptable for police to inflict pain on kindergarten "miscreants".

[-] 1 points by AntiOWSer (18) 2 years ago

Until you can provide proof that the officer intentionally injured the out of control girl trying to restrain her (after she's injured others), I'm not going to jump to conclusions.

[-] 0 points by TechJunkie (3029) from Miami Beach, FL 2 years ago
[-] 1 points by AntiOWSer (18) 2 years ago

At this current point, it's showing 0 points. (So one person voted it down?)

I've seen an official news story refer to cops as "Agents of the 1%," which is ludicrous. But I half expect someone to vote my posts down just on my name alone.

[-] 1 points by JadedGem (895) 2 years ago

The principle could have requested help from special ed people hired in his district. The principle could have called mental health and began the process of family and children's services taking temporary custody of the child (since parents could not be reached) to get it sent to a mental healthcare facility held for observation, diagnosed and treated for a week or more. I for one think the cops and juvenile courts are are preferable to dealing with social services and that a few hours at the police station is less traumatic than being driven in a police car to a psych ward and held for a week. Then the aftermath is will the parents provide psychiatric care for the child and can the child be returned to them. If the parents had forbidden special ed testing and placement the principle might have felt that involving special ed was not palatable to the parents, leaving the police station or family and children's services as his options. People all over this country are being trained to call the police more and more. They are expected to learn to go quietly and be a model inmate and it is disturbing. However, the scare of being arrested does inspire many kids with problems to do their best to over come anger issues. There is no reason to believe an arrested child has been abused or brutalized by the police. My special ed daughter was arrested at age 11 for terroristic acts and threats after she refused to believe her principle when he explained to her that what she had done was indeed a crime. She was smiling and in good spirits while they were finger printing her. The officer was nice and quite good with her. The juvenile judge understood she was special and he talked with her and said he would hold the case for one year and if she he did not see her back, it would go away and not be on her record. She tried hard to be better and not be a bully and the school is quite happy with her turn around. Her grades are better, she tutors her peers. She has problems, yes but they see her trying now. My other child wanted to be put in my special daughter's special school so she talked with the school councilors about suicide. She ended up at mental health. I signed forms and they transported to a mental hospital two hours away in the back of a police car. They held her for a week and adjusted her meds. She is doing excellent now as well and the school is pleased with her progress and that she is smiling more and is a happier more well adjusted child. She however was clingy for quite awhile after her trip so it affected her to be separated from her family. Accept the services available for your children or else is the message parents are getting. I can't say accepting help and utilizing the resources available is a bad thing for the kids though.

[-] 0 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

I read the linked page. Interesting examples. In several of the examples, including this latest one - it looks like the child was having some sort of psychiatric breakdown. How would recommend that a child be restrained who is out of control?

I did note that the author of the list also stated:

:"In the old days, if a kid got out of line a school administrator would give that child a little paddling and that would be the end of it.

These days, police are called out for even the most minor incidents. I would say that being arrested by police, put in handcuffs and marched down to the police station is far more traumatic that a couple of whacks with a ruler or a paddle."

Do you think corporal punishment is the answer? I have to admit...it worked wonders when I was in school.

[-] 1 points by ShubeLMorgan2 (1088) from New York, NY 2 years ago

Corporal punishment or better, some sort of physical restraint inside the school would have been much better. If the child was actually having a psychiatric breakdown maybe an ambulance would have been appropriate, no?

[-] 1 points by gestopomillyy (1695) 2 years ago

back in the day.. i think that term was tantrum. not psychotic break down. yes corporal punishment for 5 yr olds is a better answer

[-] 1 points by friendlyopposition (574) 2 years ago

From some of the accounts I have read, it goes beyond just being a tantrum.