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Free @RevBilly Black Friday Music Demonstration at J.P. Morgan Chase

Posted 4 months ago on Nov. 26, 2013, 3:47 p.m. EST by OccupyWallSt (1) from Plainfield, NJ

The Reverend Billy Talen, a longtime Occupy Wall Street supporter, is now facing a year in prison simply for preaching on the environmental record of JP Morgan Chase. We ask the Occupy community to raise the alarm. Join us on Black Friday (November 29, 2013) for a musical peace protest. Let ALL our voices be heard. We will not be silenced.


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Rev. Billy Talen is an actor who uses comedy, theater, and music to persuade large corporations and entities to address environmental issues. In June 2013, he and a few members of the “Church of Earthalujah” choir walked into the lobby of a JP Morgan Chase branch. Dressed in toad hats (the central American golden toad species to be precise, which has been made extinct) they told the staff that they were about to perform "expressive politics."

As the choir sang, Talen, who impersonates a Baptist preacher, delivered a short sermon about climate change and Chase's record in financing the biggest fossil fuel industrial projects in the world. Talen and choir director Nehemiah Luckett were arrested and charged with riot, trespass, unlawful assembly and disorderly conduct. The prosecutor has called the performance a "criminal stunt," and demanded that Talen go to prison for an entire year! The trial starts on 9 December.

Talen, who has been performed around the world for more than 20 years, said he was surprised and worried by the charges against him. "Our whole thing was 15 minutes long. And for 15 minutes [they] want to put us in jail for a year?" he said. "I've served three days in the Los Angeles prison in 2006, other than that – my 75 arrests were usually just overnight. It's surprising."

Earlier this year the choir, which often draws on Broadway actors, did a similar performance at an HSBC branch in London but no one was arrested. In 2011, the group "exorcised" BP in the main turbine hall of the Tate in London. JP Morgan Chase, which has revenues of $21bn a year and assets of $2trillion, was last week ordered to pay a record fine of $13bn after admitting it made serious misrepresentations to the public over mortgages.

On Black Friday (November 29, 2013), the Occupy Wall Street community will gather at JP Morgan’s NY Headquarters for a musical peace protest to support our friends. The original Occupy Drum Circle will be reuniting for the first time in over a year, to support this specific action, and the freedom of expression. Please join us from 8AM to 8PM, bring your instruments, your voices, or just yourselves. Thanks to you all.

Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/1432764656938153/

46 Comments

46 Comments


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[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

May God ( and every rational individual ) bless this holiday season - as the worst EVER for the Greedy - and - YES - you know who you are.

[Removed]

[+] -5 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

JPMorgan Chase is a great company. As a shareholder of it, I can't believe you want to protest it. What has it done wrong? Also, a revenue of $21 billion is not much for JPMorgan. Their revenue was $97 billion last year, about 5 times what you claimed. Get your facts right.

[-] 2 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Do you even read these articles before spouting off, sham rag? From the OP: . . . "after admitting it made serious misrepresentations to the public over mortgages."

Also, "11 ways JPM admitted it ripped off Americans to the tune of billions:"

http://www.alternet.org/economy/jp-morgans-corporate-crime-confession?paging=off&current_page=1#bookmark

As a shareholder and obvious shill for the 0.1%'ers, you must be really proud.

[-] -3 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

Yes, I do read them. As a shareholder, I have to keep track of news on companies that I have ownership in. The government may or may not have bullied them into saying that, but regardless, they have done much more good than bad. They saved WaMu and Bear Sterna, for one.

[-] 2 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

"The government may or may not have bullied them . . ." I'm not sure what elixir awakened you from your 20 year slumber, but it kinda works the other way round nowadays. And I imagine "saving' amoral, predatory, criminal enterprises like WaMu and BS fall under the heading of "doing God's work."

Thanks for the laugh, shamrag. Whatever helps you sleep at night.

[-] -3 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

Please do not insult my name and make personal comments. Also, they are not criminal, amoral, or predatory at all, but simply ones that made bad business decisions and were too leveraged. Although the phrase about God's work is from GS and not JPM, it is still true, even though I see your sarcastic tone in the comment. When they saved these companies, it helped their CLIENTS as well. People with investments or deposits in these institutions were helped by JPM. Banking in general is indeed good work because financing allows for great things to happen and humans to go places. About the bullying, it's not necessarily the other way around. US regulators have been very tough on Wall Street (maybe a little TOO much). But really, don't call me shamrag.

[-] 3 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Please do not insult my name

I think "U" already did that.

[+] -4 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

I'm not sure what that means.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

I'm sorry if U R stupid - but that "would" explain "a-lot".

[+] -4 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

I am definitely not stupid. Academically, I was one of the top students in the country when I was in school.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Book Smart & reality dumb? U R not alone in that failing. Blame U'r school system - if U want.

[+] -4 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

How am I reality dumb? I'd say I'm quite successful, thank you very much.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Of course U would - in U'r fantasy world - which cares for no-one but U.

[-] -1 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

Dude, you are a raging troll right now. Have you made a single comment recently with real content and not just hate on me?

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

"U" reap what "U" sow.

[Removed]

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

If that's really your name, I apologize. I assumed it was a fictitious username, like most of us use.

I can't disagree with this statement: "Banking in general is indeed good work because financing allows for great things to happen and humans to go places." That's mainly true, I think. Emphasis on "in general."

But my god, man, to claim these companies "simply made bad business decisions" and that they didn't engage in all manner of criminal acts can only mean you've been turning a blind eye. And regulators being TOO tough on Wall Street? Sorry, sharmag, it'll be impossible to have a conversation with someone so obviously biased.

[-] -3 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

It is a modification of my name. Many things they did were possibluly immoral, but not outright illegal. There was some illegality as well, but surprisingly little. American regulators have been very tough (perhaps too was an overstatement, but tough enough). I'm sorry if I appear biased, but I was just trying to say that adequate punishment has already been dealt.

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Well, considering you're a proud Wall Streeter, you biases are understandable, I guess, and we all suffer from them to one degree or another. You do realize, of course, that you're on the wrong forum for someone expecting to hear any thing resembling sympathy for the TBTF's, right? I mean, saying JPM isn't "as bad" as, say GS, doesn't really count for much here. The lesser evil is still evil.

JPM took $25 Billion in taxpayer money during the bailout, and they possibly receive as much as another $14 Billion a year in subsidies. I know Dimon "claims" they didn't need the stinkin' bailout money, and I'd rather not get into whether or not it was all paid back. I've heard both schools of thought on the payback and aren't really in a position to say either way.

But personally, fuck Dimon, Geithner et al. They should be thrown in prison for what they've done to the global economy and the TBTF's should be broken up. Or at the very least, we should go back to the Glass-Steagal days.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

They should be thrown in prison for what they've done to the global economy

Or a wood chipper - um sorry - flashback to Fargo

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

"many an asshole has learned this lesson - too late."

History has proven that many times. I wonder what's going to be the tipping point, and who'll be the first recipients?

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

The 1st ? = the worst ( well perhaps not the worst - but definitely in reach )- the lackeys. Opposite of trickle down - the insane assholes have that as a buffer - but I am wondering just how fast the lackeys will fall and then it will be TPTBs turn.

[-] 0 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Trickle-up vigilante justice.

It works for me. ;-)

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

vigilante

vigilante? NO - perhaps only in what the justice system ( our chosen system ) has failed ( refused ) to do. So - NO - not vigilante - just delayed justice. IMO

[-] 2 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

So, no pitchforks and nooses for you? Well, hell, that won't be any fun.

But I'll take it however I can get it. But first we'd have to get the judicial system back on track and start doing their job. As it is, they're just as crooked as the rest of DC.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Edit: I don't want to see justice start from the bottom - OH HELL NO - from the top - that is where the worst mass murderers are - at the TOP.

So, no pitchforks and nooses for you

I never said that - if it fits the criminal - to bad so sad for them - And - I am not their judge - their actions "are".

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

"Thanks for what?"

For asking jart to PM me.

See you tomorrow.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

G-Night

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

". . . from the top - that is where the worst mass murderers are - at the TOP."

Yep. Anyway, I gotta sign off for the night. Goodnight, D. And thanks again.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Thanks for what? You have nothing that I know about to thank me for. And it is the assholes at the top who should pay most severely.

[-] 0 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

Not at all.

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

". . . just sucks that too many that should not die " will " because of all of those who have sold themselves."

Sadly, true. Sold themselves. Prostituted themselves. In some cases sold their souls.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

So many - so so many - lost as they can not or will not see what is best for "ALL" - not the few - ALL.

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Yep, it boggles the mind.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

That is a problem with being - good - kind - caring - "too many good people die" prior to the surviving good people saying - ENOUGH - and slap down the bastards.

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

True. What's also sadly true is that good - kind - caring people are looked at by the predators and sociopaths as being "suckers," "weak" and "pushovers."

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Yes - that is how it goes - UNTIL IT DOES NOT - good in no way means sheep to be led to slaughter - and many an asshole has learned this lesson - too late.

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

The wood-chipper scene from Fargo, heheh. I'm a definite fan of the Coen Brothers off-beat sense of humor.

Yep, saying I think they should be thrown in prison was being kind for the new guy. As I was typing those words, my mind was more fixated on "WWZD." "What would ZenDog do?" Visions of Mussolini and his mistress hanging from light poles were dancing in my head.

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

Hmmmmm obviously you should not hang-out with ZD - but who am I to object.

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Hmmm, a day spent with ZD would be . . . . enlightening, heheh.

And I'll admit, although I'm a generally peaceful man, I tend to agree with some of his latest assessments. That, chances are, heads will eventually have to roll. ;-)

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

That, chances are, heads will eventually have to roll

OMG - is there anyone "ANYONE" ???? who does not see that happening? If this Fossil Fuel and general corp(se)oRATe crap does not get squashed - Is there anyone who thinks things will "not" get bloody?

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Oh, it'll get bloody alright. As long as it's the 'right" people's blood being spilled, I'm good. ;-)

[-] 2 points by DKAtoday (33128) from Coon Rapids, MN 4 months ago

The right blood " WILL " get spilled - just sucks that too many that should not die " will " because of all of those who have sold themselves.

[+] -4 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

Jamie Dimon is highly respected as one of the best CEOs out there. Geithner maybe, but not Dimon should be thrown in prison. He really didn't need the money, considering JPM's strength. Aldo, I think they have been conformed to have paid back the government in full. GS is also a good bank. Here on Wall Street, JPM and GS are often seen as "white knights" and institutions of a higher standing than, let's say, BoA for example. Yes, I probably am biased. I am just on this forum to look at the opposite point of view.

[+] -5 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

Also, I am not a shill and am just voicing my opinion. Can people not have opinions in line with those you are fighting?

[-] 1 points by gnomunny (5739) from St Louis, MO 4 months ago

Yes, they can, although they should have facts to back up their claims. Saying JPM is a great company sounds like you either haven't been paying attention to all the recent revelations about the antics of the TBTF banks or you're shilling for them. Does LIBOR-rigging or money laundering for the Mexican drug cartels ring any bells? Hell, those two come immediately to mind and I don't even pay all that much attention to the big banks. If a lowly peon like myself is privy to these how is it someone like you, with a vested interest, missed them?

Or is it simply stock performance that determines for you whether some place is a "great company?"

[+] -5 points by sharmag (-115) 4 months ago

There was bad business throughout the 2008 crisis. However, JPM was and is better than most other banks and will continue to be. Its superior business practices and higher moral standards than most banks are why it wasn't as leveraged and didn't fail, and in fact was strong enough to acquire two other companies. It is a 100+ year old bank that has always been among the best in the world and has survived many tough times. Looking back, it funded many of the big things that are part of history today. For example, John Pierpont Morgan, founder of the firm, funded the early railroads and Nikola Tesla. His moral code was high and he did great things. This heritage continues to this day, as JPM is a highly respected and prestigious bank that just came out of another recession stronger than ever. While it made some mistakes, we know that everyone did and they were better than most others. That's why it's a great company.